helpGNU Spanish Translation Team - Support: sr #110661, ecstatic-magpie-35041790279802459

 
 

sr #110661: ecstatic-magpie-35041790279802459

Submitter:  None
Submitted:  Sat 21 May 2022 08:45:42 PM UTC
 
Category:  None Priority:  5 - Normal
Severity:  6 - Security Status:  None
Privacy:  Public Assigned to:  None
Originator Name:  Ainna Celeste Cawley Originator Email:  -email is unavailable-
Open/Closed:  Open
* Mandatory Fields

Add a New Comment (Rich Markup)
   

Comment Type & Canned Response:
       

 

Sat 21 May 2022 08:45:42 PM UTC, original submission:  

Sureños ([suˈɾe.ɲos]; Spanish: Southerners)‍, Southern United Raza, Sur 13 or Sureños X3 are groups of loosely affiliated gangs[36] that pay tribute to the Mexican Mafia while in U.S. state and federal correctional facilities. Many Sureño gangs have rivalries with one another, and the only time this rivalry is set aside is when they enter the prison system.[4][29][37] Thus, fighting is common among different Sureño gangs even though they share the same common identity. Sureños have emerged as a national gang in the United States.[5]

Sureños
Founded
1967; 55 years ago[1]
Founding location
Southern California, United States
Years active
1967–present[2]
Territory
35 U.S. states (primarily in southern California, Nevada, Arizona, Texas), Mexico[3]
Ethnicity
Mexican American, Mexican[2]
Activities
Murder,[2] drug trafficking,[2][4] extortion,[2] assault,[2] theft, robbery,[2] fraud, human trafficking,[4] and arms trafficking[5]
Allies
18th Street gang[6]
Armenian Power[7][8][9]
Aryan Brotherhood[10][11][12]
Avenues[13]
El Monte Flores[14]
Familia 27[15]
Florencia 13[16]
Gulf Cartel[17]
Mexican Mafia[18]
Mongols[19]
Ontario Varrio Sur[20]
Playboys[21]
Puente 13[22]
Santa Monica 13[23]
Toonerville Rifa 13[24]
Vineland Boys[25]
White Fence[26]
Rivals
Bloods[27]
Latin Kings[28]
Norteños[29][30]
Nuestra Familia[31]
Tiny Rascal Gang[32][33][34][35]
Notable members
Ruben Cavazos
David Barron Corona
Santiago Villalba Mederos
Timothy Joseph McGhee
Luis J. Rodriguez
Joe Saenz
Jose Guillen Open main menu
Wikipedia
Search
Jalisco New Generation Poster
article Talk
language
Download PDF
Watch
Edit
The Jalisco New Generation Cartel ( Spanish : Cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación ) or CJNG , formerly known as Los Mata Zetas , [42] [43] [44] [45] is a semi-militarized Mexican criminal group based in Jalisco which is headed by Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes ("El Mencho"), one of the world's most-wanted drug lords . [46] The cartel has been characterized by its aggressive use of extreme violence and its public relations campaigns. [3]Although the CJNG is particularly known for diversifying into various types of criminal rackets , drug trafficking (primarily cocaine and methamphetamine ) as well as stealing crude oil remain among their most profitable criminal activities. [8] [3] The cartel has also been noted for cannibalizing some of its victims, sometimes during the training of new sicarios or cartel members as well as using drones to attack their enemies. [9] [47] [39] US prosecutors have said operatives of the cartel tried to buy belt-fed M-60 machine gunsin the United States, and once brought down a Mexican military helicopter with a rocket-propelled grenade . [48] ​​As of 2020, the CJNG is generally considered by the Mexican government to be the most dangerous criminal organization in Mexico [27] and the second most powerful drug cartel in the country after Sinaloa Cartel . [49] CJNG is heavily militarized and violent compared to other criminal organizations. They have a special operations group and other groups for specific types of warfare. [50] Training for these groups is intense. An inside look at CJNG's hitman training program reveals a strict environment with high stakes. [51]The CJNG is the most dominant criminal group in the state of Jalisco but the cartel also dominates criminal and drug operations in the states of Nayarit and Colima , with the latter being an important area for shipments of South American cocaine and chemical precursors from Asia. [52] While this cartel is best known for its fights against the Zetas and Templarios , it has also been heavily battling Cárteles Unidos for control of Aguililla, Michoacán and its surrounding territories, including the city of Tepalcatepec . [38] [28] [53]More recently, tensions have also begun to rise against the CJNG's arch-rival, the Sinaloa Cartel within the states of Chiapas and Zacatecas .

Jalisco New Generation Poster
Jalisco New Generation Cartel
Cártel de Jalisco Nueva Generación logo 3.png
Logo of the Jalisco New Generation Poster
founded
August 31, 2009
founder
Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes and Ignacio Coronel Villarreal
Founding location
Guadalajara , Jalisco, Mexico [1] [2]
years active
2009–present [1] [3]
territory
Mexico:
Jalisco, Nayarit, Aguascalientes, Colima, Guanajuato, Veracruz, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Zacatecas, Islas Marías, Sinaloa, Michoacán, Guerrero, Veracruz, Oaxaca, Quintana Roo, Chiapas, Tabasco, Querétaro, Tamaulipas, Hidalgo, San Luis Potosí, Edomex, Morelos, Puebla[4][5][6]
Guatemala
United States:
California, New York, Illinois, Texas, Georgia
South America:
Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, Venezuela, Chile, Bolivia, and Guyana
Ethnicity
Hispanic
Membership
6,000–20,000 (suspected)[citation needed]
Leader(s)
Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes (El Mencho)
Juan Carlos Valencia González (El 03)
Ricardo Ruiz Velasco (El RR)
Criminal activities
Drug trafficking, arms trafficking, human trafficking, people smuggling, murder, kidnapping, racketeering, extortion, petroleum theft, assault, prostitution, money laundering[7][8][9][10][11]
Allies
Los Cuinis
Grupo Elite[12] (paramilitary wing)
Grupo Guerrero (armed wing)[13][14]
Sangre Nueva Zeta[15]
Grupo X (armed wing)[16][17]
Grupo Delta (armed wing)[18][19]
Los Cabos (armed wing in Baja California)[20]
Zicuirán New Generation Cartel[21]
San Luis Potosí New Generation Cartel
Tláhuac Cartel[22]
Juárez Cartel
La Línea[23]
Caborca Cartel
Gulf Cartel
Clan del Golfo
'Ndrangheta[24]
Guerreros Unidos[25]
Camorra
Nuestra Familia
Caza Templa-Viagras[26] (armed wing in Michoacán)
La Fuerza Anti-Unión[22]
Cartel of the Suns
Norteños
Sacra Corona Unita
Yakuza
Rivals
 Mexico[27][28][29]
Nueva Plaza Cartel[30]
Knights Templar Cartel[31]
Tijuana Cartel
La Familia Michoacana
Cártel del Noreste
La Unión Tepito[22]
Los Zetas[32][3]
Zetas Vieja Escuela[3]
Barrio Azteca (current status unknown)
Sinaloa Cartel[33][34][35]
Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel[36]
Los Viagras[37]
Cárteles Unidos[38][39][10]
Autodefensas[28]
Los Correa[17]
Cartel del Abuelo
Grupo Sombra[40][41]
Gente Nueva
La Nueva Familia Michoacana[11]
Jalisco New Generation Cartel started as one of the splits of Milenio Cartel, the other being La Resistencia. La Resistencia accused CJNG of giving up Oscar Valencia (“El Lobo”) to the authorities and called them Los Torcidos (“The Twisted Ones”). The Jalisco Cartel defeated La Resistencia and took control of Millenio Cartel's smuggling networks. Jalisco New Generation Cartel expanded its operation network from coast to coast in only six months, making it one of the criminal groups with the greatest operating capacity in Mexico as of 2012 and still today.[54] The Sinaloa Cartel, once led by Joaquín Guzmán Loera (a.k.a. El Chapo), has used the Jalisco New Generation Cartel as its armed wing to fight off Los Zetas in Guzmán's turf and to carry out incursions to other territories like Nuevo Laredo and Veracruz in the past.[55] In the period following the emergence of the CJNG cartel, homicides, kidnappings and the discoveries of mass graves spiked in Jalisco.[3] Currently, along with the armed conflicts, petroleum theft and criminal extortion, the CJNG is also said to have over 100 methamphetamine labs throughout Mexico. Based on the average street value, these volumes could net upwards of $8.1 billion for cocaine and $4.6 billion for crystal meth each year.[8]

In 2017, the CJNG reportedly broke its alliance with Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada of the Sinaloa Cartel.[35] By 2018, the CJNG became the second most powerful cartel in Mexico.[56][57][58] In 2018, CJNG co-founder Érick Valencia Salazar and former high ranking CJNG leader Carlos Enrique Sánchez also both left the cartel and co-founded a rival cartel called the Nueva Plaza Cartel.[59][60][61][30] The CJNG are currently fighting La Nueva Plaza cartel for control of the city of Guadalajara, Jalisco; La Unión Tepito in Mexico City; Los Viagras and La Familia Michoacana for the states of Michoacán and Guerrero; Los Zetas in the states of Veracruz and Puebla; Cártel del Noreste in Zacatecas; the Cártel de Sinaloa in Baja California, Sonora,[62] Juárez, Zacatecas and Chiapas; as well as the Santa Rosa de Lima Cartel in Guanajuato.[63] They currently have an alliance with the Cártel del Golfo in Zacatecas, La Línea in Juárez and several smaller cartels in Mexico City which help it fight against La Unión Tepito.[22]

Combatting CJNG is proving difficult because of the recent reorganization of the police force in Mexico. The retention and hiring of new police officers is poor,[64] and without enforcers of the law, many of Mexico’s smaller communities lack a police presence.[65] Vigilantism is one way in which these communities are resisting the control of cartels. Although the government is asking these groups to lay down their arms, the vigilantes continue with some success.[65]

In March 2019, Texas Republican congressman Chip Roy introduced a bill that would list the Jalisco New Generation Cartel, the Gulf Cartel and the Cártel del Noreste faction of Los Zetas as foreign terrorist organizations. Former United States President Donald Trump had also expressed interest in designating cartels as terrorist organizations.[66] However, he halted plans to do so at the request of Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.[67] From 2018 to 2020, the CJNG engaged in 298 reported acts of gang related violence; more than any other cartel during the period.[68]By 2020, US counter-drug officials considered CJNG its "biggest criminal drug threat" and Mexico's former security commissioner called the group "the most urgent threat to Mexico's national security." [27]

History
arrests
Current operations and territories
See also
Appearances in video games
references
External link
Last edited 3 days ago by BenMcDonnell
Wikipedia
Content is available under CC BY-SA 3.0 unless otherwise noted.
privacy policy Terms of UseDesktop

Anonymous

 

(Note: upload size limit is set to 16384 kB, after insertion of the required escape characters.)

Attach Files:
   
   
Comment:
   

No files currently attached

 

Depends on the following items: None found

Items that depend on this one: None found

 

CC list is empty

 

There are 0 votes so far. Votes easily highlight which items people would like to see resolved in priority, independently of the priority of the item set by tracker managers.

Only logged-in users can vote.

 

 

 

 

No changes have been made to this item

Back to the top


Powered by Savane 3.9